CV vs Resume: Key Differences to Choose Between the Two

Resume Help

A CV is what? Does it differ in any way from a resume?

Why do some applicants submit a CV while others do so with a resume? Which of the two is genuinely superior to the other? Is a resume simply a CV spelled differently?

You may learn everything there is to know about the differences between a CV and a resume in only five minutes.

This manual will demonstrate:

A resume definition and sample, as well as a CV (Curriculum Vitae) definition and sample.

A comparison of the differences between a CV and a resume.

When applying for jobs in the US or Canada, when to use a CV and when to utilize a resume.

What a CV is outside of North America and what kind of application you should use abroad.

The Difference

A resume is a one- to two-page document that highlights your qualifications, education, and professional experience. A CV (Curriculum Vitae) is a lengthier document that covers every aspect of your professional history. A CV is utilized for academic purposes; a resume is used for employment searches.

A resume is a one- to two-page document that highlights your qualifications, education, and professional experience. A CV (Curriculum Vitae) is a lengthier document that covers every aspect of your professional history. A CV is utilized for academic purposes; a resume is used for employment searches.

What is a CV?

A CV, or curriculum vitae (full form), is a detailed document that details the whole path of your work. Curriculum Vitae is Latin for “course of life.” Normally two or three pages lengthy, it can be spread out across ten or more pages if necessary. A Curriculum Vitae includes information on your training, professional experience, publications, accolades, awards, and other accomplishments. A CV is exclusively used for academic applications in the USA and Canada, such as those for academic positions, grants, research scholarships, etc.

What to Include in a CV:

  1. Contact Information
  2. Research Objective, Personal Profile, or Personal Statement
  3. Education
  4. Professional Academic Appointments
  5. Books
  6. Book Chapters
  7. Peer-Reviewed Publications
  8. Other Publications
  9. Awards and Honors
  10. Grants and Fellowships
  11. Conferences
  12. Teaching Experience
  13. Research Experience / Lab Experience / Graduate Fieldwork
  14. Non-Academic Activities
  15. Languages and Skills
  16. Memberships
  17. References

Resume

A resume, sometimes known as a résumé, is a brief, to-the-point document that is used in the US and Canada when applying for jobs. A resume’s main function is to give potential employers a synopsis of the applicant’s professional background. A excellent CV should be one to two pages long and tailored to a specific position.

What to Include on a Resume:

  1. Contact Information including Job Title
  2. Resume Summary or Resume Objective
  3. Work Experience
  4. Education
  5. Skills
  6. Additional Sections (Awards, Courses, Resume Publications, Licenses and Certifications, Interests, etc.)

What’s the Proper Resume Spelling?

Although originally spelled “résumé” in French, in English both forms—”resume” and “résumé”—are correct.

The Difference In a Nutshell

The size, design, and intended use of these papers distinguish a CV from a resume. While resumes are normally one to two pages long, a CV has no length restriction. A resume condenses abilities and employment history, whereas a CV describes a candidate’s whole academic background.

Difference between CV and Resume

 

Length

Layout

Purpose

CV

No page limit

In-depth description of your academic and professional experience

For academic placements

Resume

1 page

Brief document highlighting your professional experience

For all kinds of jobs

Resume vs. CV: International Differences & When to Use Which

The phrase “CV” refers to the equivalent of a US resume, a brief, focused document you use to apply for employment, in New Zealand, the UK, Ireland, and all other European nations. No such thing as a “resume” exists there.

A New Zealand or European CV and an American résumé are just slightly different in regional terms.

“Curriculum Vitae” and “resume” are synonyms that can be used interchangeably in Australia and South Africa. Both terms refer to a one- to two-page paper that is concise.

Job searchers in South Asia might need to utilize a biodata, a somewhat different document. It’s a document with more individualized, “biographical” information, including income, date of birth, gender, race, and ethnicity. In Bangladesh and India, it is widely employed.

But—

Don’t send over a biodata if a South Asian company expressly requests a “resume” or “CV.” Choose a resume that complies with American resume standards.

Additionally, a strong cover letter that complements your CV will set you apart from other applicants.

Key Takeaway

Here is all you need to know about the differences between a resume and a CV and when to use each one:

  • Write a resume if you’re seeking for a job in the US or Canada. Keep it concise and tailor it to the job posting.
  • Write a Curriculum Vitae for academic employment in North America and include any pertinent information about your academic or professional background.
  • You must submit a “CV” when applying for jobs in Europe or New Zealand, however a European CV is really quite similar to an American résumé.
  • The terms “CV” and “resume,” which both refer to a brief document that is comparable to the US resume, are interchangeable in Australia and South Africa.
  • While “CV” and “resume” have the same meaning in South Asian nations as they do in the United States, submitting a biodata is frequently required when applying for jobs.